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Hymn Study – Charlotte Mason Mondays

  |   Charlotte Mason Mondays, Christian Parenting, Curriculum, Language Arts, Lesson Plan, Teaching - all grades   |   12 Comments

 

Do you do hymn study in your homeschool?

Hymn study is an easy, painless way to immerse your kids in solid theology. It takes less than 10 minutes to regularly sing and briefly talk about one hymn at a time.  By singing one hymn repeatedly for a month or so, your children will not only memorize the hymn, they’ll absorb its theology.

Have you thought about doing hymn study before, but wondered how you’d do it?

In this post, I’ll show you how to include hymn study in your homeschool. If your children are very young, keep it simple and mainly sing. But as your children become a little older, it’s time to dig in!

 

Charlotte Mason on Hymn Study:

Perhaps we do not attach enough importance to the habit of praise in our children’s devotion. Praise and thanksgiving come freely from the young heart; gladness is natural and holy, and music is a delight. The singing of hymns at home and of the hymns and canticles in church should be a special delight; and the habit of soft and reverent singing, of offering our very best in praise, should be carefully formed.

But the duty of praise is not for occasional or rare seasons; it waits at our doors every day.

 A regular part of the Charlotte Mason student’s repertoire was the memorization of three hymns per 12-week term. Singing hymns in corporate worship is not only a wonderful way to begin your school day, but it’s also a useful way to teach solid theology to your children.

Even if you prefer contemporary worship, the lessons you’ll learn by studying the hymns of our faith are invaluable. Don’t miss this opportunity!

Additionally, you can use hymns for recitation, copy work and dictation.

An added benefit is that your auditory learners will love singing hymns!

Having your own hymnal is helpful for hymn study, but you can also find tons of hymns online at websites such as NetHymnal.  One thing that’s handy about NetHymnal is that it often provides interesting background about the hymn as well as its writers.

Hymn Study Made Easy

In our family, we learn one hymn about every month, depending upon the length and “language” of the hymn. (Some of the words and concepts are lengthier and/or more difficult than others.)

Our basic routine:

1.  First, choose a hymn, type up the words and copy them for each child. It’s often helpful to copy each stanza together in paragraph form to enable children to really focus on the words.

If you have young children, you might want to copy the hymns using the Startwrite Program, especially if you plan to use the hymn for copy work.

2.  Before presenting the hymn to your children, read a little about its history. You can read a little about the authors’ history, as well.

Usually, one person created the words and another came up with the melody.  Again, the NetHymn site is helpful for this and often you discover some captivating tidbit about the hymn’s history or authors.

3.  Point out the theology inherent in the hymn, particularly if you have older children, and identify new words as necessary.

4.  Sing the hymn with all of its verses (or not, as you choose) each day.

5.  If you or one of your children play the piano or guitar you’ll have accompaniment!

You’d be surprised how easily memorization comes if you faithfully sing the hymn every day for a month!

 

An Example from Our Study

Blessed Assurance, Jesus is Mine, written by Fanny Crosby (words) 1820-1915 and Phoebe Palmer Knapp (music) 1839-1908.  Here is a copy of the words with the music.

1.  Discussion about the hymn

  • How did the author know that Jesus “was hers”?  How do you know that Jesus is yours?  (This is a perfect opportunity to discuss the gospel with your children, especially if they have not yet accepted Jesus as their Savior.)
  • What does ‘heir of salvation,’ and ‘Purchase of God’ mean?  Who are heirs of salvation?  How have we become “purchased of God”?  Who purchased us?  How?  (Again, the Cross!) Look up and discuss some or all of the following verses:

Galatians 4:7 So you are no longer a slave, but a son; and since you are a son, God has made you also an heir.

Romans 4:13 It was not through law that Abraham and his offspring received the promise that he would be heir of the world, but through the righteousness that comes by faith.

Galatians 3:29 If you belong to Christ, then you are Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise.

Titus 3:7 So that, having been justified by his grace, we might become heirs having the hope of eternal life.

  • Depending upon the ages and understanding of your children, other phrases that can be discussed (with scripture) from this hymn are:

“Born of His Spirit”

“Washed in His blood”

“Perfect submission” (what that means and the “perfect delight” and peace –“all is at rest”-that results from obedience)

2. Discussion about the author

  • Fanny Crosby, an American woman who lived from 1820 to 1915, wrote the words to this hymn.  And she wrote thousands of hymns, yet she was blinded as an infant after being treated by an incompetent doctor.  How do you think you might feel about God if that had happened to you?
  • This is how she felt about her blindness:

It seemed in­tend­ed by the bless­ed prov­i­dence of God that I should be blind all my life, and I thank him for the dis­pen­sa­tion. If per­fect earth­ly sight were of­fered me to­mor­row I would not ac­cept it. I might not have sung hymns to the praise of God if I had been dis­tract­ed by the beau­ti­ful and in­ter­est­ing things about me.

  • Explain how she felt in your own words.  How do you think she could feel that way after what had happened to her?
  • Phoebe Palmer Knapp was a long-time friend who went to the same church as Fanny. Reportedly, Mrs. Knap played Fanny the melody on the piano that became Blessed Assurance and Fanny came up with the song title on the spot!

3.  Sing, with accompaniment if possible, Blessed Assurance, Jesus is Mine, every day for a month.

 

Extend the Study

  • Assign one stanza each week as copy work.
  • Memorize one stanza each week to be recited.
  • Ask your older student to research Fanny Crosby and/or Phoebe Palmer Knapp and write 3-5 paragraphs about each of their lives and work
  • Request that your older student find Scripture pertaining to other phrases in this work mentioned above (Born of His Spirit, Washed in His blood, etc.)
  • Have your student write out this hymn in his own words.
  • After studying this hymn, have your student create her own hymn.
  • Assign your student to find a passage of Scripture and compose a melody to accompany it.

 

How do I fit it in?

I know what you’re thinking. You would just love to do hymn study but you’re having enough trouble trying to get in math and writing.

I understand.

You can keep this as simple as you like or start as slowly as you want.  But you and your children’s lives and family worship will be enriched by hymn study, I promise!

If you start this when your children are on the younger side, think of how many hymns they could learn by the time they are in high school!

Do you do hymn study in your home?  How do YOU do it?

hymn study - dana

 

 

Perhaps we do not attach enough importance to the habit of praise in our children’s devotion. Praise and thanksgiving come freely from the young heart; gladness is natural and holy, and music is a delight. The singing of hymns at home and of the hymns and canticles in church should be a special delight; and the habit of soft and reverent singing, of offering our very best in praise, should be carefully formed.But the duty of praise is not for occasional or rare seasons; it waits at our doors every day. –Charlotte MasonA regular part of the Charlotte Mason student’s repertoire was the memorization of three hymns a term. Singing hymns in corporate worship is not only a wonderful way to begin the day, but it is also a very useful way to teach solid theology to your children.Even if you prefer contemporary worship, the lessons to be learned by studying the hymns of our faith are invaluable and should not be missed.Hymns can also be used for recitation, copy work and dictation. Additionally, your auditory learners will take quickly to memorizing hymns as it is obviously accomplished by singing them aloud.Having your own hymnal is helpful for hymn study, but you also can find a multitude of hymns online at websites such as NetHymnal.One thing that’s handy about NetHymnal is that it often provides additional information about the hymn writers’ lives and background that aid the teacher in presenting a hymn. Hymn Study Made EasyIn our family, we chose to learn one hymn about every month, depending upon the length and “language” of the hymn. (Some of the words and concepts are lengthier and/or more difficult than others.) Here is our routine:1.First, choose a hymn, type up the words and copy them for each child. It is often helpful to copy each stanza together in paragraph form to enable children to really focus on the words.If you have young children, you might want to copy the hymns using the Startwrite Program, especially if you plan to use the hymn for copy work.

2.Before presenting the hymn to your children, read about its history as well as that of the authors (usually one person created the words and another, the melody).Again, the NetHymn site is helpful for this and often you discover some interesting tidbit about the hymn’s history or authors which can create more interest on the part of the children in learning it.J

3.Point out the theology inherent in the verse and identify new words.

4.Sing!

5.If you or one of your children play piano or guitar, make sure you include an instrument in your singing.

6.You would be surprised how easily memorization comes if you faithfully sing the hymn every day for a month.

An Example from Our Study

1.Blessed Assurance, Jesus is Mine, written by Fanny Crosby (words) 1820-1915 and Phoebe Palmer Knapp (music) 1839-1908.Here is a copy of the words with the music.

2.Discussion about the hymn

nHow did the author know that Jesus “was hers”?How do you know that Jesus is yours?(This is a perfect opportunity to discuss the gospel with your children, especially if they have not yet accepted Jesus as their Savior.)

nWhat does ‘heir of salvation,’ and ‘Purchase of God’ mean?Who are heirs of salvation?How have we become “purchased of God”?Who purchased us?How?(Again, the cross!) Look up and discuss some or all of the following verses:

oGalatians 4:7
So you are no longer a slave, but a son; and since you are a son, God has made you also an heir.

oRomans 4:13
It was not through law that Abraham and his offspring received the promise that he would be heir of the world, but through the righteousness that comes by faith.

oGalatians 3:29
If you belong to Christ, then you are Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise.

oTitus 3:7
so that, having been justified by his grace, we might become heirs having the hope of eternal life.

nDepending upon the ages and understanding of your children, other phrases that can be discussed (with scripture) from this hymn are:

oBorn of His Spirit

oWashed in His blood

oPerfect submission (what that means and the “perfect delight” and peace –“all is at rest”-that results from obedience)

3. Discussion about the author

nFanny Crosby, an American woman who lived from 1820 to 1915, wrote the words to this hymn.She wrote over 8,000 hymns, yet she was blinded because she was treated by an incompetent doctor when she was an infant.How do you think you might feel about God if that had happened to you?This is how she felt about her blindness:

It seemed in­tend­ed by the bless­ed prov­i­dence of God that I should be blind all my life, and I thank him for the dis­pen­sa­tion. If per­fect earth­ly sight were of­fered me to­mor­row I would not ac­cept it. I might not have sung hymns to the praise of God if I had been dis­tract­ed by the beau­ti­ful and in­ter­est­ing things about me.

nPhoebe Palmer Knapp was a long time friend who went to the same church as Fanny.It is said that Mrs. Knapp played Fanny the melody that became “Blessed Assurance” and Fanny came up with the song title on the spot!

 

4.Sing, with accompaniment if possible, “Blessed Assurance, Jesus is Mine,” every day for a month. Additional options:

nAssign one stanza along each week as copy work.

nAssign one stanza each week as memorization to be recited.

nAsk your older student to research Fanny Crosby and/or Phoebe Palmer Knapp and write 3-5 paragraphs about each of their lives and work

nRequest that your older student find Scripture pertaining to other phrases in this work mentioned above (Born of His Spirit, Washed in His blood, etc.)

nHave your student write out this hymn in his own words.

nAfter studying this hymn, have your student create her own hymn.

nAssign your student to find a passage of Scripture and compose a melody to accompany it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 Comments
  • Hymn Study: Charlotte Mason Mondays | Aug 15, 2015 at 5:44 pm

    […] hymn study (and listening) as part of your devotions time and/or family rest […]

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    […] to include next year? Picture study for your younger students? Picture study for your older ones? Hymn study? Music […]

  • Carisa | Aug 26, 2012 at 8:34 pm

    Thank you for sharing how hymn studies work in your home, we are starting this year and I was clueless of how to begin other than singing! I love how you laid out your post, thanks so much, it was very helpful!

    • Dana | Aug 26, 2012 at 8:43 pm

      I’m so glad it was helpful to you, Carisa! It is so much easier to start something new with a plan. 🙂

  • Dana | Oct 27, 2010 at 7:11 pm

    Thank you for commenting, Nancy! It is always helpful to hear what others are doing with hymn study. I love the idea of implanting this wonderful theology in young minds in such a painless fashion. 🙂

  • Nancy | Oct 27, 2010 at 12:50 am

    Dana,
    Thank you for sharing these detailed plans for a hymn study! We learn two hymns a semester for our school and one hymn for our Family Sunday School class. It truly is a wonderful and natural way to learn so many of God’s truths, not to mention the comfort and beauty they add to our lives.
    Godspeed,
    Nancy

  • Dana | Oct 26, 2010 at 4:32 pm

    Hi Lindsey! We have always studied history chronologically and worked composer/music study in with history – doing it that way helped me be more regular about it. I’m glad you enjoyed the post!

  • Lindsey | Oct 26, 2010 at 2:53 pm

    LOVE THIS!!!! 🙂 I have been trying to do composer study regularly but I need to remember to add in the hymns more often and also folksongs 🙂

  • Dana | Oct 23, 2010 at 6:20 pm

    I’m sure you will enjoy adding hymn study to your school this quarter! Thank you, Katie, for taking the time to comment!

  • Katie @ Riddlelove | Oct 22, 2010 at 4:51 pm

    This is such a helpful unit study! We’re incorporating it into our school this quarter. Thanks so much for sharing!

  • Dana | Oct 22, 2010 at 1:56 am

    Hi Amy!
    I sure enjoyed the posting describing Micah’s last trip down the Amazon! Thank you for giving us a glimpse of what your lives are like!

    Thanks for taking the time to comment – I am glad you enjoyed the post! I enjoyed yours as well. 🙂

  • amy in peru | Oct 5, 2010 at 2:08 pm

    Hey there Dana! I posted recently on the same thing, we do pretty much the same thing, but I thought that perhaps your readers might want to see another family’s hymn study… it’s here:
    http://fisheracademy.blogspot.com/2010/09/hymn-study-our-method.html
    and here:
    http://fisheracademy.blogspot.com/2010/09/hymn-study-i-am-resolved.html

    We LOVE hymn study!
    Thanks for posting all these great ideas! 😉

    amy in peru

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